Resources

In this section you will find a host of resources for teaching IBSE. We’ve searched through many books, education packs and websites to find resources relevant for teaching in botanic gardens and other informal education settings. For each one we’ve prepared a short review and a link to the relevant website. We have also developed resources especially for the INQUIRE project. These are available to everyone participating in an INQUIRE course. To sign up for an INQUIRE course click here.

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IBSE reports   |  

18/06/13  |  

“"Natural curiosity” a resource for teachers on environmental inquiry

Learn how to build children’s understanding of the world through environmental inquiry. The Natural Curiosity manual explains the different aspects of environmental inquiry and tells the stories of teachers who have integrated it into their practice.

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IBSE reports   |   Report

09/01/12  |  Report

Taking IBSE into secondary education

What does inquiry-based science education mean for students and teachers? What are the challenges to current practice in IBSE in terms of the curriculum, pedagogy, assessing students’ learning and whether students view content as relevant? Find out how education researchers and science teachers and educators joined their expertise and experience to address these issues during the International conference: Taking IBSE into secondary education held at York, UK in October 2010.

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16/10/13 | London

Climate change is happening- The IPCC’s fifth report

IPCC report published in September reveals that, due to human activity, average global temperatures are at their highest for 1400 years. It is already affecting the planet and it's only going to get worse. With the report suffering backlash from still unconvinced critics, how are the public to know what to believe?

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