LATEST DISCUSSIONS

Discussions   |   Biodiversity  |  Climate Change

14/07/11  |  Europe

EU considers valuing nature to halt biodiversity loss

The EU has proposed incorporating the economic value of biodiversity into its decision-maiking, accounting and reporting systems, as part of a new strategy that aims to protect and restore some of Europe's most vulnerable habitats.

Expand to view comments | 5 comments

Comments

This is important. I would like to propose a natureright system whereby the use of animal and plant images are linked to payment of a licence fee that goes to support conservation and habitat protection. For example, the polar bears in Coca Cola advertising would be chargeable at a particular rate that goes to Arctic or polar bear conservation.

by Sarah D | 13/12/11 04:54:12

Interesting idea!

by julia.willison | 11/01/12 01:00:01

why is my comment that is written in English and posted on the English page also appearing on the German page?

by julia.willison | 11/01/12 01:01:01

Op zich vind ik dat een goed voorstel maar eigenlijk is het erg dat we niet zelfsprekend rekening kunnen houden met natuur. Opkomen voor natuur betekent niet dat we ons enkel moeten richten op gebieden met een hoge natuurwaarde. Geen enkel natuurgebied mag opgegeven worden. Het is niet omdat een natuurgebied niet echt waardevol is dat het mag verdwijnen om er bv een weg door te trekken. Voor buurtbewoners heeft dit gebied wel een maatschappelijke waarde en dit is niet in geld uit te drukken. Mensen willen enkel 'hun' natuurgebied behouden wat de waarde ook moge zijn van het natuurgebied. door krist.tack | 14, Dec 2011 09:41:12

by krist.tack | 13/07/12 06:15:07

Want to comment? You need to sign in or register with INQUIRE

SIGN IN      JOIN

Discussions   |   Climate Change  |  Curriculum

14/07/11  |  England

Climate change should not be excluded from English national curriculum

A review of the English national curriculum is underway and a report will be published later this year. Tim Oates, head of the expert panel reviewing the panel said that it should be up to schools to decide whether – and how – to teach climate change.

Expand to view comments | 2 comments

Comments

I feel that climate change is something that should remain on the curriculum for the following reasons: i) Students feel it is relevant and important and it generates powerful discussions. ii) It provides a useful opportunity to link different key Scientific ideas e.g. chemical reactions in combustion, heat transfer in Physics. They can also learn about some of the pioneering work being done to combat climate change. iii) It gives students an opportunity to analyse real experimental data and understand that in a complex world, there isn't always one obvious correct answer that everyone agrees on. They also see how scientists and politicians might work together. iv) If they don't learn about it, how can they make informed decisions about their lives - decisions that could affect the future of all of us?

by HGallagher | 29/10/11 10:56:10

Op zich vind ik dat een goed voorstel maar eigenlijk is het erg dat we niet zelfsprekend rekening kunnen houden met natuur. Opkomen voor natuur betekent niet dat we ons enkel moeten richten op gebieden met een hoge natuurwaarde. Geen enkel natuurgebied mag opgegeven worden. Het is niet omdat een natuurgebied niet echt waardevol is dat het mag verdwijnen om er bv een weg wordt doorgetrokken. Voor buurtbewoners heeft dit gebied wel een maatschappelijke waarde en is dit niet in geld uit te drukken. Mensen willen enkel 'hun' natuurgebied behouden.

by krist.tack | 14/12/11 09:41:12

Want to comment? You need to sign in or register with INQUIRE

SIGN IN      JOIN

Discussions   |   Botany

14/07/11  |  UK

Botany: A Blooming History

What makes plants grow is a simple enough question. The answer turns out to be one of the most complicated and fascinating stories in science as Timothy Walker, director of Oxford University Botanic Garden, explains in the BBC4 programme "Botany: A Blooming History".

First   1 | 2 ... 14   15   16   Last

Polls View previous polls

What is the biggest barrier to implementing IBSE in your practice?

Concern that I might lose control over the class during IBSE activities
Knowing which questions to ask to facilitate the IBSE activity
Changing from a didactic approach to an inquiry-based approach
Concern that the students will not be able to carry out the IBSE activities
Lack of confidence in delivering IBSE


Accessibility

              

Supported by

  Share on Facebook